Watch this powerful video of a homeless family occupying a foreclosed home in Brooklyn. To learn more visit here.

If you have a few minutes this holiday weekend I strongly urge you to watch these great 1min. Master Class videos by the prolific photojournalist Steve McCurry. Short and informative.

Swoon piece sighting this morning in Ft.Green Brooklyn.

Swoon piece sighting this morning in Ft.Green Brooklyn.

Photo by Tim Mantoani
Last night I had the great privilege of meeting the artist, fimmaker, and photographer William Wegman. He is a kind and humble man and I have a new appreciation for the beautiful and witty work he has created in partnership with his dogs whom he considers artistic collaborators.
If you haven’t looked at Wegman’s work in a while, here are a few to enjoy:

Photo by Tim Mantoani

Last night I had the great privilege of meeting the artist, fimmaker, and photographer William Wegman. He is a kind and humble man and I have a new appreciation for the beautiful and witty work he has created in partnership with his dogs whom he considers artistic collaborators.

If you haven’t looked at Wegman’s work in a while, here are a few to enjoy:

This video looks beautiful…what a cool idea for a project!

"On July 24, 2010, thousands of people around the world uploaded videos of their lives to YouTube to take part in Life in a Day, a historic cinematic experiment to create a documentary film about a single day on earth."

My friend Todd Shalom is running a kick-starter campaign to fund the third season of Elastic City's conceptual and poetic walks. Take a look and support if you can!

"Started in May 2010, Elastic City commissions artists to give sensory, performative and ritualistic walks in New York City and beyond. Eventually, we’d like to expand to give walks in all parts of the world.

Some themes of past walks have included: making monuments with our bodies in response to existing public monuments; ridding space of bad luck and bringing forth good luck through the creation of new folk rituals; and sculpting visual and sound poems using found objects.

These are all experiential, participatory walks—as opposed to the ‘moving lecture’ model that defines fact-based walking tours. When you arrive at an Elastic City walk, you are welcomed as an active participant. The artist leading the walk offers you their lens, guidance and techniques to further the poetry in our relationships with each other and the surrounding environment.”

Occupy Wall Street!

Images from my visit to Liberty Square 10/10/11

Enjoying my first school-free weekend in five weeks! Spent the beautiful day at the park digging into some great thesis research courtesy of Sir Ken Robinson’s “Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative.” Thankful to have a few days to recharge and get reinspired.

Enjoying my first school-free weekend in five weeks! Spent the beautiful day at the park digging into some great thesis research courtesy of Sir Ken Robinson’s “Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative.” Thankful to have a few days to recharge and get reinspired.

Changing Education Paradigms

Wonderful animated video “adapted from a talk given at the RSA by Sir Ken Robinson, world-renowned education and creativity expert and recipient of the RSA’s Benjamin Franklin award.”

For more information on Sir Ken’s work visit: http://www.sirkenrobinson.com

A wonderful post from jonathansadlowe addressing the important issue of mountain top removal. Please read: 

Greetings Friends,

Two images to share:

1) Google Earth overlay indicating current locations of Appalachian mountain top removal (aka strip mining for coal); and 2) A photo of a mountain that has been strip mined.

As you can see, strip mining for coal is a destructive practice. It is worse on the environment than burning coal itself! Strip mining destroys ecosystems and decreases biodiversity. It pollutes rivers and streams. It destroys resources that many people and animals in the Appalachian region depend on. Once a mountain has been strip mined the ecosystem is harmed forever! Would you want to live near that mess?!?! 

Is strip mining necessary? Of course not! It’s just cheaper and easier for coal companies. This is one of the many bad corporate practices that needs to change in America.

Is it possible to stop stip mining from happening? Yes of course it is!!!

If we the people change our behavior then businesses will change their behavior. If we consume less energy in our daily lives, then the need for coal and strip mining will decrease.

Is it possible to still live the good life while using less energy? Yes of course it is!!!

Simply be aware of your energy consumption while at home and in the office. During the day keep your lights off, and at night just use one light at a time in your home (or better yet use a candle like Thomas Jefferson did!). Ask your office manager to turn the lights off in the office when everyone leaves (many companies leave lights on 24/7 even when employees are not there!). Run your AC or heater less each day. Open your windows when it’s nice out. Dress warmer while at home or use a blanket instead of using the heater. Try placing notes around your home to remind you to use less energy!!!

Sure it takes a little extra effort to be aware of these things, but it makes the world a better place now and for our children and grandchildren and their grandchildren. And the good folks in Appalachia won’t have to be surrounded by the negative effects of strip mining! That’s gotta make you feel good!

Lastly, encourage your friends and family to improve their energy usage habits.

Learn more about mountain top removal at iLoveMountains.org. If you live in the Appalachian region, you should email your Congressional Representative and voice your opinion to stop strip mining!

Help the YES MEN reach their kickstarter goal and fund the YES LAB for Creative Activism.

Among my adventures this weekend as a New York City Hurricane Refugee, I visited the NY State Fair in Syracuse, NY. Highlights included the Cheese Sculpture, Miniature Horse Driving competition, Llamas, Goat Pavilion and the Antique Tractor Parade. I now also can affirm with some confidence that the people who live in the rest of the great state of New York are just as crazy as the 8 million who live in the five boroughs.  

JUMP! Central Park Sheep Meadow 8/21/11

Just baked a little late summer Sunday peach cobbler!

Just baked a little late summer Sunday peach cobbler!

The past few months I’ve truly been enjoying the tasty bounty my CSA has provided: ripe peaches, large yellow squash, leafy kale, fresh cucumbers, hearty turnips. I get excited before each pickup to see what grab bag of items I will get and then rush home to immediately start figuring out what I can make with them all. Cooking has become one of my favorite ways to spend an evening. This season, (my 2nd year of the CSA) I’m starting to feel more confident/experimental in the kitchen with all the unique types of veggies I have which I never ate growing up in the mid-west and I love the chance to experiment with new recipes (such as the super tasty beat hummus I’m having for lunch!)  However, there have definitely been a few weeks where I have more food in the fridge then I have time to cook and it sadly goes straight into the compost. I don’t want this to happen again, and so I’ve started to research how to preserve my food so I can enjoy my veggies year round. Last summer I was pretty intimidated at the thought of canning (all the supplies, and mostly the fear of botulism)…but I’ve been getting good first hand advice from the Chaw Chaw Man himself and I stumbled upon “CANNING for a new generation" yesterday at a local book store so I decided this would be the summer to go for it!  
Anyone have some beginners tips?!

The past few months I’ve truly been enjoying the tasty bounty my CSA has provided: ripe peaches, large yellow squash, leafy kale, fresh cucumbers, hearty turnips. I get excited before each pickup to see what grab bag of items I will get and then rush home to immediately start figuring out what I can make with them all. Cooking has become one of my favorite ways to spend an evening. This season, (my 2nd year of the CSA) I’m starting to feel more confident/experimental in the kitchen with all the unique types of veggies I have which I never ate growing up in the mid-west and I love the chance to experiment with new recipes (such as the super tasty beat hummus I’m having for lunch!)  However, there have definitely been a few weeks where I have more food in the fridge then I have time to cook and it sadly goes straight into the compost. I don’t want this to happen again, and so I’ve started to research how to preserve my food so I can enjoy my veggies year round. Last summer I was pretty intimidated at the thought of canning (all the supplies, and mostly the fear of botulism)…but I’ve been getting good first hand advice from the Chaw Chaw Man himself and I stumbled upon “CANNING for a new generation" yesterday at a local book store so I decided this would be the summer to go for it!  

Anyone have some beginners tips?!